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Did you know you can reject your first financial aid offer?

Carly Gillis
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Tons of students don’t know about “aid appeal.”

It’s easy to feel grateful when you receive your financial aid offer, but it’s worth it to consider if what you got is really enough. Compare that amount to what you really need to get through your college experience — chances are, there’s a pretty big gap.

Aid appeal is a process where you can argue for more financial aid. With a little research, a well-worded letter, and a bit of extra time, you can get thousands more in aid. For real!

Check out this video for a quick how-to (& continue reading below): 

“Aid appeal” is especially effective if you’ve recently experienced a big change in your family’s financial situation.

Divorce, death, job loss — these unexpected circumstances should not go without extra aid. If your family has gone through a huge change like these, aid appeal can help your college get a more accurate picture of your needs.

Here are the three things you’ll need to get it done.

First, find out whether your college needs an actual physical letter or an email. (In very rare circumstances, you may have to physically show up, so it’s best to clarify this with the financial aid office.)

And while you’re at it, also get the due dates you have to meet in order to process your appeal.

Second, gather any special forms or documentation you need that relate to your “unmatched needs,” like proof of the circumstances we described above. Think certificates, pay stubs, tax forms, or any other physical papers that would back up the facts of your situation.  

Third, think about how you’d make a clear case as to why you need more financial aid. Don’t assume your documents speak for themselves — really make the situation clear. Include that in a real, persuasive letter to accompany your papers. 

Once all of that is ready, send it along… and hope for the best.

Photo by Sean Kong on Unsplash

If it sounds scary and nerve-racking, we’ve got you.

It’s worth it. Most people who go through the appeal process get thousands of dollars more in aid money than what their school originally offered.

And if you do it with us, just know that 80 percent of people who appeal their aid with Frank receive more money — we get our students an extra $5,000 on average.

We’re here for you! Aid appeal is just one of the services we provide here at Frank. Check it out and, if you like it, consider sharing this information with someone you know who wants more money for college, too!

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We are not affiliated with the U.S. Department of Education. Federal Student Aid (FSA), an office of the U.S. Department of Education, makes the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) form and assistance available to the public for free at fafsa.gov.

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